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Tax Deed Foreclosures in Florida – The Ultimate Guide

We Buy Tax Delinquent Property in Florida

In this comprehensive article, we will delve into various aspects of Tax Deed Foreclosures in Florida. This includes an exploration of what constitutes a Tax Deed Foreclosure in Florida, the available options for individuals confronting a Tax Deed Foreclosure, and strategies for retaining your property or making a profit before a Tax Deed Foreclosure in Florida due to delinquent on your real estate tax bill.

Furthermore, we will discuss the intricacies of tax deed foreclosures, providing insights into the purchasing process and exploring avenues for generating income through interest in acquiring Tax Certificates.

Don’t Allow Delinquent Taxes End Up in A Tax Deed Foreclosure in Florida

Facing financial challenges that hinder your ability to pay real estate taxes in Florida? Whether it’s an inherited property, an unwanted vacant lot, or your primary residence, understanding your options and rights is crucial. Neglecting the issue could lead to a tax deed foreclosure in Florida. However, why let that happen when there might be equity in your property?

We specialize in providing quick cash offers for tax-delinquent properties in Florida, helping individuals secure thousands, and sometimes tens of thousands, before facing a tax deed auction. Instead of delving into an extensive guide on tax deed foreclosures in Florida, take a moment to submit the form below with your property information. We can promptly provide you with an offer, ensuring you don’t reach the stage of a Tax Deed Auction!

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Now, if you are reading this article because you want to learn about buying tax deeds or tax certificates in Florida, read on, as this will provide a lot of detail. But it is also important to know the property’s owner’s rights. So let’s keep on…

Is Florida A Tax Deed State?

florida tax deed state

First off, it’s important to understand the laws that govern the state of Florida for Tax Deeds.

All Deed States Are Different…

Florida is indeed a tax deed state, which means that the process for collecting delinquent property taxes involves the sale of tax deeds. In Florida, when property owners fail to pay their property taxes, the local government (usually on a county level) has the authority to sell a tax deed to recover the unpaid taxes.

This process is governed by Chapter 197 of the Florida Statutes.

The tax deed sale is a public auction where interested buyers bid on the right to purchase the tax deed. The winning bidder receives a tax deed, which essentially transfers the ownership of the property to the new owner. It’s important to note that you, as the property owner, have a redemption period during which they can pay the delinquent taxes and reclaim their property. This can also happen upon the sale of the property to a buyer like us, where any back owed taxes, fees, and interest are paid at closing, leaving you the remaining balance less any other liens or encumbrances (And we pay closing costs!). If the taxes remain unpaid by the end of the redemption period, the tax deed holder gains full ownership of the property. This isn’t necessary if you are delinquent on your real estate taxes in Florida. However, time is of the essence and we can buy your property in some cases in less than 7 days!

Investors often participate in tax deed sales as a way to acquire real estate at potentially lower prices. However, navigating the complexities of tax deed sales in Florida requires a thorough understanding of the legal processes involved. Interested parties should familiarize themselves with the specific rules and procedures outlined in Florida’s statutes to ensure a smooth and lawful transaction.

What is The Difference Between A Tax Lien and a Tax Deed in Florida?

In Florida, tax liens and tax deeds are distinct mechanisms employed by local governments to address unpaid property taxes. These processes serve as a means for local authorities to recover delinquent tax payments. Understanding the difference between a tax lien and a tax deed is crucial for property owners and investors involved in tax lien auctions.

A tax lien in Florida is essentially a legal claim against a property due to unpaid property taxes. When property owners fail to pay their taxes, the local government may issue a tax lien on the property. Investors, in turn, have the opportunity to purchase these liens at auctions. By doing so, they essentially step into the shoes of the local government, lending the property owner the necessary funds to pay off the tax debt. In return, the investor receives the right to collect the owed amount plus interest from the property owner.

On the other hand, a tax deed in Florida is a document issued by the local government that grants ownership of a property to an individual or entity as a result of the property owner’s failure to pay taxes. When property taxes remain unpaid for an extended period, typically 2-3 years, the local government may conduct a tax deed sale. During this auction, individuals or investors bid on the tax deed, and the highest bidder acquires full ownership of the property. The previous owner loses all rights to the property, and the new owner gains possession of the property.

What Happens If I Have A Tax Foreclosure on My Property in Florida?

Tax foreclosure is a legal process that occurs when property owners fail to pay their property taxes. In Florida, like in many other states, tax foreclosure can have serious consequences for property owners. Understanding the intricacies of this process is crucial for anyone facing the possibility of tax foreclosure in Florida.

tax foreclosure florida

Initiation of the Tax Foreclosure Process in Florida

The tax foreclosure process in Florida typically begins when property owners fail to pay their property taxes for an extended period. Local tax authorities, such as county tax collectors (see all county tax collectors and resources at the end of this article), have the authority to initiate foreclosure proceedings.

Notices and Warning Periods of the Tax Foreclosure Proceedings in Florida

Property owners receive notices regarding overdue taxes, providing them with a warning about potential foreclosure. It’s important to pay attention to these notices, as they serve as a final warning before legal action is taken. The majority of times, these notices are mailed to the last known address on file with the Property Appraiser Office.

Tax Certificate Sale in Florida

While we will go into much more detail on tax certificates in Florida, in order to recoup the unpaid taxes, Florida counties may hold tax certificate sales, where investors can purchase the tax certificates associated with delinquent properties. Property owners still have the opportunity to redeem their property by paying the overdue taxes, plus any associated fees and interest.

Redemption Period After Florida Tax Certificate Sale

Florida provides property owners with a redemption period after a tax certificate sale during which they can repay the outstanding amount and reclaim their property. The duration of the redemption period varies, but it typically ranges from a few months to a couple of years.

Final Judgment and Tax Auction Foreclosure Florida

If the property owner fails to redeem the property within the specified period, the tax certificate holder may apply for a final judgment. Once the court grants the final judgment, the property may be auctioned off to the highest bidder.

Eviction and Possession Transfer in The Event of a Tax Auction Foreclosure in Florida

If the property is sold at auction, the new owner may initiate eviction proceedings to take possession of the property. The former owner is required to vacate the premises, and the new owner assumes legal ownership. If you are a homeowner, facing this situation, we can help!! Don’t delay. Reach out to us ASAP. No cost or obligation!

Deficiency Judgment Due To a Tax Auction in Florida

In some cases, if the auction proceeds do not cover the total debt, a deficiency judgment may be pursued against the former property owner. This judgment allows the tax certificate holder to seek repayment of the remaining amount.

Experiencing a tax foreclosure on your property in Florida can be a challenging and stressful situation. It’s essential to be aware of the process, timelines, and potential outcomes. Property owners are encouraged to take proactive measures, such as redeeming their property during the redemption period, to avoid the more severe consequences associated with tax foreclosure. Seeking professional guidance can also be instrumental in navigating this complex legal process.

How Does a Tax Foreclosure Work in Florida?

As mentioned, in Florida, property taxes are assessed annually, and if they remain unpaid, the local tax collector may initiate foreclosure proceedings.

The first step in the tax foreclosure process involves the issuance of a tax certificate by the county tax collector. This certificate represents the government’s claim on the property and the outstanding tax amount. Investors can purchase these tax certificates through auctions, providing the government with immediate funds to cover the unpaid taxes. This makes the local government happy so they have the necessary funds to pay bills, pave roads, etc. The property owner, however, still has a chance to redeem the property by paying the outstanding taxes, plus any accrued interest and fees, within a specified redemption period.

If the property owner fails to redeem the property within the redemption period, the tax certificate holder may apply for a tax deed. The issuance of a tax deed transfers ownership of the property from the original owner to the certificate holder. Subsequently, the property may be sold at a public auction, with the highest bidder becoming the new owner which we will discuss more in detail. It’s essential to note that the original property owner loses all rights to the property once the tax deed is issued, making the foreclosure process a serious consequence for unpaid property taxes in Florida.

Can I Make Payments to Catch up on Defaulted Real Estate Taxes in Florida

In Florida, property owners facing defaulted real estate taxes have the option to make payments to catch up and resolve the default. The process typically involves contacting the county tax collector’s office, where the property is located, to discuss the outstanding tax amounts and inquire about available repayment options.

Florida counties may offer installment plans or other arrangements to help property owners gradually pay off the overdue taxes. It is crucial for individuals in this situation to proactively communicate with the tax authorities, understand the terms of any proposed payment plans, and adhere to the agreed-upon schedule to prevent further complications. Resolving defaulted real estate taxes through payment plans provides property owners with a pathway to regain financial stability and maintain ownership of their properties. Remember, at the end of this guide, you will find access and resources to all 67 Clerk of Court Florida Counties.

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How Long Can Property Taxes Go Unpaid in Florida?

Property owners in the state are required to pay their property taxes annually. The duration that property taxes can go unpaid in Florida is subject to specific timelines and legal procedures.

Typically, property taxes in Florida become delinquent if not paid by April 1st of each year. Once the taxes are delinquent, the property owner has until June 1st to pay them to avoid further penalties. If the taxes remain unpaid after June 1st, a 3% penalty is applied, along with interest accruing at a rate of 1.5% per month. This interest continues to accumulate until the taxes are paid in full. It’s important for property owners to be aware of these timelines and to prioritize the timely payment of their property taxes to avoid additional financial burdens.

Moreover, if property taxes remain unpaid for a more extended period, the property may become subject to the tax deed sale. These certificates represent a lien on the property, and the certificate holder has the right to apply for a tax deed sale if the taxes remain unpaid after a certain period, typically around two years.

How Long Does an Owner Have To Redeem Property Sold for Back Taxes in Florida?

In Florida, the redemption period is typically two years from the date of the tax deed sale. During this time, the property owner can reclaim ownership by satisfying the financial obligations incurred due to unpaid taxes. It’s important for property owners to be aware of the specific deadlines and requirements for redemption to avoid losing ownership rights entirely. If the property owner fails to redeem the property within the specified timeframe, the tax deed purchaser obtains full ownership rights to the property. This means that the former owner loses all claims to the property, and the purchaser gains title to the property.

How Does a Tax Deed Online Auction Work in Florida?

In Florida, a tax deed online auction is a method through which properties with unpaid property taxes are sold to the highest bidder. The process is initiated when property owners fail to pay their property taxes, leading to a tax certificate being issued against the property. These certificates represent a lien on the property and are subsequently auctioned off to investors. The online auction provides a platform for potential buyers to bid on these tax certificates.

To participate in a tax deed online auction in Florida, interested bidders typically need to register on the designated online platform. All links are at the end of this article. The auction itself is a competitive bidding process where participants place bids on the tax certificates. At the end of the auction, the highest bidder wins the certificate and acquires the right to claim ownership of the property if the property owner does not redeem the tax certificate within a specified redemption period. It’s important for participants to conduct thorough research on the properties and understand the associated risks before participating in these auctions, as properties acquired through tax deeds may have various encumbrances or liens.

florida tax deed auction

What Is The Deposit Amount Needed in A Tax Deed Auction in Florida?

The exact deposit amount for a Tax Deed Auction in Florida can vary between counties, so it is essential for prospective bidders to check with the specific county’s tax collector office or the auction organizer to determine the current deposit requirements.

For example, in Lee County Florida it is $200 or 5% of the Maximum Bid (whichever is greater) for each property you anticipate winning at the auction sale.  Other areas like Orange County and Alachua County can be less.

In many cases, the deposit is a percentage of the estimated final bid amount. It is important for bidders to be aware of the deposit requirement well in advance of the auction date, as failure to submit the required deposit may result in disqualification from participating. Additionally, successful bidders on the Tax Sale must be prepared to pay the remaining balance of the bid amount within a specified timeframe, typically within 24 to 48 hours after winning the auction. Understanding and meeting the deposit requirements are fundamental steps for individuals interested in participating in tax deed auctions in Florida.

Can Other Participants See My Tax Deed Bid at Auction in Florida?

During the auction, participants may gather either in person or through online platforms to place their bids on the properties of interest. Again, this varies county to county. As bids are submitted, some are displayed publicly, allowing other participants to be aware of the ongoing bidding activity. However, some counties keep a closed bidding process for their tax deed auctions in Florida.  

It’s important for individuals participating in tax deed auctions in Florida to familiarize themselves with the specific rules and procedures set by the county conducting the auction. This knowledge will help them navigate the process confidently and understand the visibility of their bids in the context of that particular auction.

How Do I Pay For A Deposit For A Tax Deed Auction in Florida?

The first crucial step is to identify the county where the tax deed auction is scheduled to occur. Florida consists of multiple counties (listed below), each with its own distinct rules governing tax deed sales.

Once the relevant county is determined, the next step is to contact the county clerk’s office. The county clerk’s office serves as a central hub for information related to tax deed auctions, and they can provide detailed guidance on the payment process.

florida delinquent taxes

Inquiries about the accepted methods of payment for the deposit should be directed to the county clerk’s office. Different counties may have varying preferences for payment methods, which can include cashier’s checks, money orders, or other specified forms of payment. It is crucial to ensure that the chosen method complies with the county’s requirements to avoid any complications in the deposit submission process.

Once the necessary information is obtained, individuals should seek detailed instructions on how and when to submit the deposit. The county clerk’s office will provide information on deadlines, required documentation, and any additional steps that must be followed to complete the deposit payment process successfully.

During the auction, participants may gather either in person or through online platforms to place their bids on the properties of interest. As bids are submitted, some are displayed publicly, allowing other participants to be aware of the ongoing bidding activity. However, some counties keep a closed bidding process for their tax deed auctions.  

It’s important for individuals participating in tax deed auctions in Florida to familiarize themselves with the specific rules and procedures set by the county conducting the auction. This knowledge will help them navigate the process confidently and understand the visibility of their bids in the context of that particular auction.

If I am the High Bidder in A Tax Deed Auction in Florida, How Long Do I have to Pay?

If you find yourself as the high bidder in a tax deed auction in Florida, congratulations!! However, it’s crucial to understand the timelines and obligations associated with your successful bid. The payment timeline is a critical aspect of this process.

Typically, in Florida, the high bidder is required to pay the full bid amount shortly after the auction. The exact time frame can vary depending on the county, as each county may have slightly different rules and procedures. In some cases, the payment may be due immediately after the auction concludes, while in other instances, you may be granted a short grace period, often ranging from 24 hours to a few days.

It is imperative to carefully review the auction rules and regulations provided by the county conducting the sale to determine the specific payment deadline. Failure to adhere to the payment timeline may result in forfeiture of your winning bid and could potentially lead to legal consequences. Additionally, be prepared to cover any additional fees or costs associated with the transaction, such as recording fees or documentary stamp taxes.

Does The Florida Tax Deed Sale Erase Other Liens on the Property?

In the case of Florida tax deed sales, it’s important to note that the primary focus is on clearing the property of tax liens. The winning bidder typically receives a tax deed, which extinguishes the delinquent tax debt on the property. However, the situation regarding other liens on the property is more complex.

While the tax deed sale itself doesn’t automatically erase other pre-existing liens, it does affect them in specific ways. Florida law dictates that certain types of liens may survive the tax deed sale, such as federal liens, state liens, and liens held by municipalities. Additionally, any liens recorded after the issuance of the tax deed may be unaffected by the sale.

Potential bidders and property investors should conduct thorough due diligence before participating in a Florida tax deed sale to understand the specific conditions surrounding existing liens. It’s crucial to be aware that even though the tax deed sale may clear the property of tax liens, other encumbrances may persist, affecting the buyer’s title and ownership rights.

Is There Title Insurance Buying A Tax Foreclosure in Florida?

Title insurance or at least running a title search is a crucial consideration when purchasing a property, especially through tax foreclosure in Florida. While these properties can present attractive investment opportunities, buyers should be aware of potential title encumbrance issues that may arise.

Title insurance serves as protection against any defects in the property title that may not be immediately apparent. In the case of tax foreclosures, there could be complications related to the foreclosure process or prior liens that were not extinguished during the tax sale. Title insurance or searches can help buyers mitigate the risks associated with these issues by providing coverage for legal fees and potential financial losses or an understanding of other liens against the property.

The title insurance company will typically perform this search and address any concerns before issuing a policy. But most investors will only pay for a search as winning the bid is no guarantee, and you will be out of pocket for a lot of money for title insurance.

What Do I Need To Be Aware Of When Buying A Tax Foreclosure in Florida?

be aware tax defaults florida

Tax foreclosure properties are sold as-is with no repairs, assuming any inhabitants and any liens. Conducting a title search, as mentioned, can provide valuable insights into the property’s ownership history and potential legal complications.

Additionally, buyers should be aware of any redemption periods or legal procedures that may affect the transfer of ownership. Some tax foreclosure sales may have redemption periods during which the original owner can reclaim the property by settling the outstanding taxes. Being well-informed about these timelines is essential for making informed decisions during the purchasing process.

Tax foreclosure properties are sold in as-is condition with no repairs, assuming any inhabitants and any liens. Conducting a title search, as mentioned, can provide valuable insights into the property’s ownership history and potential legal complications.

Secondly, understanding the auction process is crucial. Tax foreclosure auctions in Florida are often competitive, and bidders should be prepared to act quickly. It’s advisable to set a budget beforehand and stick to it, considering not only the auction price but also potential repair costs and outstanding debts associated with the property.

What Survives A Tax Deed Sale in Florida?

One significant exception is any federal tax liens on the property. These liens are not affected by a tax deed sale, and the federal government retains the right to collect any outstanding debts from the property’s new owner. Additionally, any existing mortgages or other liens held by government entities, such as municipal liens for improvements or code violations, may survive the sale. It’s crucial for potential buyers to conduct thorough research and title searches to identify and understand any outstanding obligations associated with the property, ensuring they are well-informed before participating in a tax deed sale in Florida.

Does A Tax Deed Wipe Out A Mortgage in Florida?

In Florida, the issuance of a tax deed does not automatically wipe out a mortgage on a property which is a big misunderstanding. When a property owner fails to pay property taxes, the local government may initiate a tax sale, where the property is auctioned off to the highest bidder. If the property is sold through a tax deed sale, the new owner acquires the property subject to any existing liens, including mortgages.

It’s important to note that while the tax deed sale doesn’t extinguish existing mortgages, it does provide the new owner with certain rights. The new owner may take possession of the property and gain the ability to collect rent or use the property in other ways. However, the mortgage lender retains its claim on the property, and the new owner is typically responsible for satisfying any outstanding mortgage debt.

Some investors will even take on the risk of knowing a mortgage is against the property and try to settle it for less than the amount owed.

How Can You Redeem A Tax Deed in Florida?

In Florida, redeeming a tax deed involves the process of repurchasing a property that has been sold at a tax sale due to the owner’s failure to pay property taxes. When a property is sold at a tax deed auction, the winning bidder is essentially purchasing the right to claim ownership of the property, subject to the original owner’s right to redeem the property within a specified timeframe.

To redeem a tax deed in Florida, the original property owner or other interested parties must pay the total amount paid by the winning bidder at the tax deed sale, plus any additional fees and interest. The redemption period varies, typically ranging from two to four years from the date of the tax deed sale. During this redemption period, the property owner has the opportunity to settle the outstanding tax debt and reclaim ownership of the property.

Can I Sell A Property with A Tax Deed in Florida?

In Florida, selling a property with a tax deed involves a unique process that differs from a traditional real estate transaction. If you have acquired a property through a tax deed in Florida and wish to sell it, there are specific steps you need to follow.

Firstly, it’s crucial to understand the redemption period associated with the tax deed. Florida law allows property owners a period during which they can redeem the property by paying the outstanding taxes, plus interest and other associated costs. Once this redemption period has passed, and you are the confirmed owner, you can explore selling the property. However, navigating the legal intricacies of selling a tax-deeded property in Florida can be complex, and seeking professional advice from a real estate attorney is highly recommended. Additionally, potential buyers may approach the transaction with caution due to the unique nature of tax-deeded properties. Properly documenting the sale and ensuring all legal requirements are met is essential to facilitate a smooth transaction.

Who Gets The Money in A Tax Deed Sale in Florida

The primary goal of these sales is to collect the outstanding taxes owed on the property.

The money generated from a tax deed sale in Florida is allocated in a specific order to cover various expenses and obligations. Firstly, the outstanding property taxes, including any accrued interest and fees, are deducted from the sale proceeds. Once the taxes are satisfied, any remaining funds are used to cover administrative costs associated with the sale. These costs may include advertising expenses, auctioneer fees, and other related fees incurred by the county during the sale process.

If there are still funds remaining after covering all taxes and administrative costs, the surplus amount is typically returned to the original property owner. It’s important to note that the order of distribution may vary by county, so potential bidders and property owners should familiarize themselves with the specific procedures and regulations in the county where the tax deed sale is taking place. Ultimately, a tax deed sale is a mechanism for the government to collect overdue property taxes and ensure that properties are returned to the tax rolls.

What is a Tax Certificate in Florida?

In Florida, tax certificates are a financial instrument that is issued to investors as a result of a tax sale. The tax sale occurs when real estate owners fail to pay their property taxes, leading to the local government selling the tax certificates as a means of collecting overdue taxes. Investors can purchase these lien certificates at public auctions, essentially lending money to the government to cover the unpaid taxes. In return, investors receive a tax certificate, which represents a lien on the property. The property owner is then required to repay the delinquent taxes along with interest to the certificate holder.

The interest rate on tax certificates in Florida is determined through a competitive bidding process at the tax sale auction. Some of the interest rates can be double-digit! The investor willing to accept the lowest interest rate wins the certificate. This system provides an opportunity for investors to earn returns on their investments while helping local governments recover unpaid property taxes. If the property owner fails to redeem the tax certificate within a specified redemption period, the certificate holder may have the right to apply for a tax deed, allowing them to take ownership of the property. Tax certificates thus serve as a unique investment avenue tied to the local real estate market and the collection of property taxes in Florida.

What Are The Risks Of Buying A Tax Certificate in Florida?

Buying a tax certificate in Florida can be a lucrative investment opportunity, but it is not without its risks.

One significant risk is the uncertainty surrounding the redemption of tax certificates. Property owners have a redemption period during which they can pay off their outstanding taxes and reclaim their property. If the property owner successfully redeems the certificate, the investor may only receive their initial investment along with a small interest amount, missing out on potential profits. Additionally, the investor faces the risk of property depreciation or damage during the redemption period, which could further impact the investment’s value.

How Long Do You Have To Hold A Tax Certificate in Florida?

Typically, the holder of a tax certificate in Florida must wait for a specified redemption period before being eligible to apply for a tax deed to the property. The redemption period allows the property owner an opportunity to repay the delinquent taxes and redeem their property. In Florida, the redemption period is usually two years from the date of the tax sale. During this time, the certificate holder must monitor the property’s status and ensure compliance with any legal requirements. If the property owner fails to redeem the taxes within the prescribed period, the certificate holder can apply for a tax deed, which may eventually lead to ownership of the property.

Why Buy A Tax Certificate in Florida

Investing in tax certificates in Florida can be an attractive option for individuals seeking opportunities at a minimal cost in the real estate market, especially for small vacant lots. Investors who purchase these certificates essentially lend money to the delinquent property owner to cover their unpaid taxes. In return, investors receive an attractive interest rate on their investment, making it a potentially lucrative venture. Furthermore, if the property owner fails to redeem the tax certificate within a specified period, investors may have the opportunity to acquire the property at a fraction of its market value. This process offers a potential for significant returns, making buying tax certificates in Florida a strategic and financially rewarding investment strategy for those well-versed in the intricacies of the market.

When Can I Purchase a Tax Certificate in Florida?

In Florida, the purchase of tax certificates is governed by the annual tax certificate sale, which is conducted by county tax collectors. Tax certificates are liens on real estate properties with delinquent taxes, and their sale serves as a method for local governments to recover unpaid property taxes. The sale typically occurs once a year, with the exact timing varying across Florida’s counties. Generally, the sale takes place shortly after the tax collector has completed the tax roll and certified the amounts due. To participate in the tax certificate sale, interested individuals or investors must register and bid on certificates for specific properties.

What Does A Florida Tax Certificate Look Like?

This certificate serves as evidence that the certificate holder has paid the delinquent property taxes on behalf of the property owner. The physical appearance of a Florida Tax Certificate can vary, but it typically includes essential information such as the property owner’s name, the property’s legal description, the amount of taxes paid, the certificate holder’s name, and the issuance date. Additionally, it may bear the official seal of the county and other relevant details. The certificate plays a crucial role in the tax lien process, allowing the holder to earn interest on the paid taxes and potentially acquire the property if the owner fails to redeem the certificate within a specified period.

How Do I Redeem A Florida Tax Certificate?

Redeeming a Florida Tax Certificate involves a specific process for individuals or businesses that have purchased tax certificates through a tax sale. To redeem a Florida Tax Certificate, the certificate holder must wait for a specified redemption period, during which the property owner has the opportunity to repay the delinquent taxes along with accrued interest and fees. If the property owner fails to redeem the certificate within this period, the certificate holder can initiate the redemption process by submitting the necessary documentation to the county tax collector’s office. This typically includes a completed application, payment of the remaining certificate amount, interest, and any additional fees. Upon successful redemption, the certificate holder receives the invested funds along with the earned interest, making the process a means of investment with potential returns for the certificate holder. It is essential to adhere to the specific procedures outlined by the respective county’s tax collector to ensure a smooth redemption process.

How To Find Tax Delinquent Properties in Florida

Tax Deed Investing can be a fantastic way to grow wealth through real estate. Finding tax-delinquent properties in Florida involves a systematic approach that requires research and attention to detail. One of the primary sources for identifying these properties is the county tax collector’s office listed below. Each county in Florida maintains a tax roll that lists properties with delinquent taxes. This information is usually accessible online, allowing potential investors or interested parties to search for properties based on various criteria, including location and tax delinquency status. If you are delinquent on your Florida real estate taxes, you can check the total amount owed here as well.

find tax delinquent properties florida

Auctions are typically held at the county courthouse or online, and interested individuals should familiarize themselves with the auction process, including registration requirements and bidding rules. It’s crucial for those seeking tax-delinquent properties to conduct thorough research on each prospective property. This includes assessing the property’s condition, market value, and any potential legal or title issues. Additionally, understanding the local real estate market trends and property values can help investors make informed decisions. Due diligence is essential to avoid unforeseen challenges and ensure a successful investment in tax-delinquent properties in Florida.

Tax Deed Foreclosures & The Clerk Of Courts in Florida

The Clerk of Courts in Florida plays a crucial role in the state’s judicial system, overseeing various administrative and record-keeping responsibilities including Tax Deed Foreclosure Auctions. The Clerk of Courts is an elected official serving a four-year term and is responsible for maintaining accurate and accessible records related to the court proceedings within their jurisdiction. The role encompasses both civil and criminal cases, as well as other legal matters.

One primary responsibility of the Clerk of Courts is to manage and preserve court records. This includes maintaining case files, processing legal documents, and ensuring that all court records are organized and accessible to the public. The clerk is also responsible for handling the financial aspects of court operations, managing fees, fines, and other monetary transactions related to court cases.

Additionally, the Clerk of Courts in Florida is often involved in facilitating court proceedings. They may assist judges in various administrative tasks, schedule court hearings, and manage the summoning of jurors. The clerk serves as a liaison between the court and the public, providing information and assistance to individuals seeking access to court records or requiring guidance on legal processes.

In the realm of elections, the Clerk of Courts may also play a role in overseeing certain aspects of the electoral process, ensuring that the election-related procedures adhere to legal requirements. This includes handling voter registration records, assisting with early voting processes, and managing election-related documentation.

Overall, the Clerk of Courts in Florida serves as an essential figure in the state’s judicial system, contributing to the efficient functioning of the courts and maintaining transparency in legal proceedings.

Below is a list of all 67 Clerk of Courts in the state of Florida, including the link to each website, main address, and phone number for each. While every county is different, the majority will have instructions on finding Tax Deed Foreclosure Auctions and Tax Certificates in each county in Florida.

Sell My Tax Delinquent Property Florida

Alachua County Clerk of Court201 East University Ave
Gainesville, Florida 32601
352-374-3609
Baker County Clerk of Court339 E. Macclenny Ave.
Macclenny, FL 32063
904-259-3686
Bay County Clerk of Court300 E. 4th Street
Panama City, FL 32401
850-763-9061
Bradford County Clerk of Court945 North Temple Ave.
Starke, Florida 32091
904-966-6280
Brevard County Clerk of CourtP.O Box 219
Titusville, Florida 32781-0219
321-637-5413
Broward County Clerk of Court201 S.E. 6th St.
Fort Lauderdale, FL 33301
954-831-6565
Calhoun County Clerk of Court20859 SE Central Avenue, Rm. 130
Blountstown, FL 32424
850-674-4545
Charlotte County Clerk of Court350 E. Marion Ave
Port Charlotte, FL 33950
(941) 505-4716
Citrus County Clerk of Court110 N. Apopka Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450
352-341-6424
Clay County Clerk of Court825 N. Orange Ave
P.O. Box 698
Green Cove Springs, FL 32043-0698
904-269-6302
Collier County Clerk of CourtPO Box 413044
Naples, FL 34101-3044
239-252-2745
Columbia County Clerk of Court173 NE Hernando Avenue,
Lake City FL. 32055
386-758-1342
Desoto County Clerk of Court115 East Oak Street, Room 101
Arcadia, FL 34266
863-993-4876
Dixie County Clerk of CourtP.O. Box 1206
Cross City, FL 32628
352-498-1200
Duval County Clerk of Court501 W. Adams St.
Jacksonville, FL 32202
904-255-2000
Escambia County Clerk of CourtP.O. Box 333
Pensacola, FL 32591-0333
850-595-4310
Flagler County Clerk of Court1769 E Moody Blvd, Bldg 1
Bunnell, FL 32110-0787
386-313-4400
Franklin County Clerk of Court33 Market Street, Suite 203
Apalachicola, FL 32320
850-653-8861
850-697-2112
Gadsden County Clerk of CourtP.O. Box 1649
Quincy, Florida 32351
850-875-8601
Gilchrist County Clerk of CourtP.O. Box 37
Trenton, Florida 32693
352-463-3170
Glades County Clerk of Court500 Avenue J
P.O. Box10
Moorehaven, FL 33471
863-946-6010
Gulf County Clerk of Court1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd.
Rm. 148
Port St. Joe, FL. 32456
850-229-6112
Hamilton County Clerk of Court207 NE 1st Street, Room 106
Jasper, FL 32052
386-792-1288
Hardee County Clerk of CourtP.O. Drawer 1749
Wauchula, FL 33873
863-773-4174
Hendry County Clerk of CourtP.O. Box 1760
Labelle, Florida 33975-1760
863-675-5217
Hernando County Clerk of Court20 N. Main St., Room 130
Brooksville, Florida 34601-2800
352-754-4201
Highlands County Clerk of Court590 South Commerce Ave.
Sebring, Florida 33870-3867
863-402-6565
Hillsborough County Clerk of CourtP.O. Box 1110
Tampa, Florida 33601-1110
813-276-8100
Holmes County Clerk of CourtP.O. Box 397
Bonifay, FL 32425
850-547-1100
Indian River County Clerk of CourtP.O. Box 1028
Vero Beach, Florida 32961
772-770-5185
Jackson County Clerk of CourtP.O. Box 510
Marianna, Florida 32447
850-482-9552
Jefferson County Clerk of Court1 Courthouse Circle
Monticello, FL 32344
850-342-0218
Lafayette County Clerk of CourtP.O. Box 88
Mayo, FL 32066
386-294-1600
Lake County Clerk of CourtP.O. Box 7800
Tavares, FL 32778
352-742-4100

We Buy Tax Delinquent Houses Cash Florida

Lee County Clerk of CourtP.O. Box 2469
Ft. Myers, Florida 33902
850-577-4000
Leon County Clerk of CourtAddress PO Box 1024
Tallahassee, FL 32302-1024
850-606-4100
Levy County Clerk of Court355 S. Court Street
Bronson, Florida 32621
352-486-5266
Liberty County Clerk of Court10818 NW SR 20
P.O. Box 399
Bristol, FL. 32321
850-643-2215
Madison County Clerk of CourtP.O. Box 237
Madison, FL 32341-0237
850-973-1500
Manatee County Clerk of CourtP.O. Box 25400
Bradenton, Florida 34206
941-749-1800
Marion County Clerk of CourtPost Office Box 1030
Ocala, Florida 34478
352.671.5610
Martin County Clerk of Court100 East Ocean Boulevard,
Suite 200
Stuart, Florida 34994
772-288-5576
Miami-Dade County Clerk of Court73 West Flagler Street,
Suite # 242
Miami, Florida 33130
305-275-1155
Monroe County Clerk of Court500 Whitehead St.
Key West, Florida 33040
305-292-3540
Nassau County Clerk of Court76347 Veteran’s Way
Yulee, Florida 32097
904-548-4600
Okaloosa County Clerk of Court101 E. James Lee Blvd.
Crestview, Florida 32536
850-689-5000
Okeechobee County Clerk of Court312 Northwest 3rd Street
Okeechobee, Florida 34972
863-763-2131
Orange County Clerk of Court425 N. Orange Avenue
Orlando, FL 32801
407-836-2000
Osceola County Clerk of Court2 Courthouse Square, Suite 2000
Kissimmee, FL 34741
407-742-3500
Palm Beach County Clerk of Court301 North Olive Ave
West Palm Beach, FL 33401
561-355-2996
Pasco County Clerk of Court38053 Live Oak Ave.
Dade City, Florida 33523
352-518-4008
Pinellas County Clerk of Court315 Court Street
Clearwater, Florida 33756
727-464-7000
Polk County Clerk of Court255 N Broadway Ave
Bartow, FL 33830
863-534-4000
Putnam County Clerk of CourtP.O. Box 758
Palatka, Florida 32178-0758
386-326-7600
Santa Rosa County Clerk of Court5841 Gulf Breeze Pkwy C
Gulf Breeze, Florida 32563
850-983-1820
St. Johns County Clerk of Court4010 Lewis Speedway
St. Augustine, FL  32084
904-819-3600
St. Lucie County Clerk of CourtP. O. Box 700
Fort Pierce, Florida 34954
772-462-6900
Sarasota County Clerk of Court2000 Main Street
Sarasota, FL 34237
941-861-7400
Seminole County Clerk of Court301 N. Park Avenue
P.O. Box 8099
Sanford, FL 32772
407-665-4450
Sumter County Clerk of Court215 E McCollum Avenue
Bushnell, FL 33513
352-569-6600
Suwannee County Clerk of Court200 S. Ohio Ave.
Live Oak, Florida 32064
386-362-0500
Taylor County Clerk of CourtP.O. Box 620
Perry, FL 32347
850-838-3506
Union County Clerk of Court55 West Main Street
Union County Courthouse Rm 103
Lake Butler, FL 32054
386-496-3711
Volusia County Clerk of CourtP.O. Box 6043
Deland, Florida 32721-6043
386-736-5915
Wakulla County Clerk of Court3056 Crawfordville Hwy
Crawfordville, FL 32327
850-926-0905
Walton County Clerk of CourtP.O. Box 1260
DeFuniak Springs, Florida 32433
850-892-8115
Washington County Clerk of CourtP.O. Box 647
Chipley, FL 32428
850-638-6289
Tax Deed Foreclosure Florida

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